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Posted: Fri Jun 19, 2015 9:29 pm 
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I didn't have a chance to post the scores earlier, so here they are. Thanks to Heather Saylor for keeping the records and to Dave Erickson for scoring the casting today.

Non level-wind:
1st: Dan Basore, 93
2nd: Henry Caldwell, 85
3rd: Dennis McNulty, 82

Level-wind
1st: Henry Caldwell, 94
2nd: Dennis McNulty, 93
3rd: Dan Basore, 92

Closed-face casting
1st: Dennis McNulty, 91
2nd: Dan Basore, 85
3rd: Robin Saylor, 79

Spinning
1st: Robin Saylor, 89
2nd (tie): John Yancey and Dennis McNulty, 86

Overall winner: Dennis McNulty, 352
2nd: Dan Basore, 347
3rd: Robin Saylor, 331

Congratulations, casters!


Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2015 2:45 am 
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Congrats, Dennis! not an easy job to knock Dan off that pedestal! Looks like you all took a pass on fly casting this round.


Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2015 10:10 pm 
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How do they score this casting Competition?

Non level-wind:
1st: Dan Basore, 93
Is it a point score determined by some algorithm secret to Orcan's
Or how many feet ,Yards,inches, it was cast.
Age of Competitor compared to age of Reel and Rod Combination.
Inquiring minds need to Know.


Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2015 11:59 pm 
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Harry,
I'm just the messenger. The folks who set up the contest will have to answer your question.
RKL


Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2015 12:55 am 
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The quick answer is that rings (about the size of a standard hula hoop) are set up at various distances and two casts are made at each one by each competitor. The competitor starts with 100 points and points are taken away based on the degree of success for each cast. Nothing is taken away if the cast lands in the ring and from 1-4 points are deducted the farther from the ring the cast lands, based on calls from the judges observing the cast...not sure of the feet missed/points removed.


Posted: Mon Jun 22, 2015 8:18 am 
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john elder wrote:The quick answer is that rings (about the size of a standard hula hoop) are set up at various distances and two casts are made at each one by each competitor. The competitor starts with 100 points and points are taken away based on the degree of success for each cast. Nothing is taken away if the cast lands in the ring and from 1-4 points are deducted the farther from the ring the cast lands, based on calls from the judges observing the cast...not sure of the feet missed/points removed.


Not to be condescending but this is more of a (Condensed ) version answer however was a Quick Response to my query and I am most grateful for the reply.
I may have asked this too Early after your Convention and I do apologize if it is too soon for it .
Should anyone have the time and or will to post the Full version of this Competition or perhaps post a link to the rules and regulations/incidentals it would be most appreciated.
If you have to be a Full Paying Member I understand the secrecy of not posting it here in your open Forums .


Posted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 1:34 pm 
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Harry,

Since this has gone for a few days now with no reply, I thought I'd "tackle" the answer for you.

To start, there are no secrets, and you certainly do not need to be a member to learn about the contest. Having served as a past president and co-host to a few national conventions for ORCA, I can tell you that above all else, participation is what we all strive for in setting these events up at each show.

In the past, rules were discussed and templates were followed to apply to the contests, right down to the age and material of the lines used on the reels. The rules and regulations of organizations such as the American Casting Association (http://www.americancastingassoc.org) were studied, and though well thought out, just didn't seem to work for a group of collectors looking to have fun casting for what are really just braggin' rights.

During a board meeting, it was suggested that we allow the convention host for each site to determine the rules, loose as they are, for each contest. For the most part, each contest has been comprised of categories, such as non-level wind casting, level wind casting and spinning. There have been additions of both a fly casting and spin-casting category, once again added at the discretion of the event host. The basic rules that have been applied to these events were outlined by John Elder above - rings, hoops or other circular targets are placed at various distances from the caster, with the goal to place your plug on or in the target. Scoring begins at 100, with points deducted for missing the target, typically 1 point per foot away, with a max of 5 points deducted for casting your plug into the next zip code. With two casts at each target, typically 5 per category, you get your final score, with the highest total winning. Combine the scores for each category and you have your casting champion for the year.

That's basically all there is to it, with some members choosing to use pre-1900 Kentucky reels for the non-level wind portion of the contest, some opting for later Shakespeare reels, etc., with the thought of using the oldest gear you have or might borrow, keeping in mind the use of "old" gear is encouraged. The same with spinning, and so on. It's really all about having fun, participating and maybe learning about a reel you've never cast before. I remember an ORCA member trying to cast an Indiana style reel for the first time, with not so great results I might add, but I won't forget the laughs and memories from that event. I can't say I've ever heard a member turn down a request to try casting a fellow competitors rig, in fact most times its encouraged by the contestants.

Sure, winning the event is great, and we celebrate the accomplishment by putting the winners name on a plaque - an attractive one at that - for all to see, and it most certainly is something to be proud of, but the bottom line is to get out, interact with other reel collectors and have fun.

Jim


Posted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 3:51 pm 
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John and Jim sum it up very accurately and it is all about having the most participate for the most fun. One thing we might look at to improve the participation is the length of time the event takes. I noticed at past events, people drop out if it takes too long, especially with additions of other categories. Maybe someone can take a poll of prospective entrants as to what categories are of interest for most there?

I seem to recall the 2005 event at Columbia Lakes, TX went really quickly. Tom and Jay set up multiple hoops for individual stations for each distance (and maybe even different reel types) and a whole bunch of people moved through them in a reasonable time. There was one judge at each station and, I believe, multiple people recording for each caster. Lots of manpower but it went smoothly and quickly. I would suggest that if possible for the next National.


Posted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 4:01 pm 
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Jim Schottenham wrote:Harry,

Since this has gone for a few days now with no reply, I thought I'd "tackle" the answer for you.

To start, there are no secrets, and you certainly do not need to be a member to learn about the contest. Having served as a past president and co-host to a few national conventions for ORCA, I can tell you that above all else, participation is what we all strive for in setting these events up at each show.

In the past, rules were discussed and templates were followed to apply to the contests, right down to the age and material of the lines used on the reels. The rules and regulations of organizations such as the American Casting Association (http://www.americancastingassoc.org) were studied, and though well thought out, just didn't seem to work for a group of collectors looking to have fun casting for what are really just braggin' rights.

During a board meeting, it was suggested that we allow the convention host for each site to determine the rules, loose as they are, for each contest. For the most part, each contest has been comprised of categories, such as non-level wind casting, level wind casting and spinning. There have been additions of both a fly casting and spin-casting category, once again added at the discretion of the event host. The basic rules that have been applied to these events were outlined by John Elder above - rings, hoops or other circular targets are placed at various distances from the caster, with the goal to place your plug on or in the target. Scoring begins at 100, with points deducted for missing the target, typically 1 point per foot away, with a max of 5 points deducted for casting your plug into the next zip code. With two casts at each target, typically 5 per category, you get your final score, with the highest total winning. Combine the scores for each category and you have your casting champion for the year.

That's basically all there is to it, with some members choosing to use pre-1900 Kentucky reels for the non-level wind portion of the contest, some opting for later Shakespeare reels, etc., with the thought of using the oldest gear you have or might borrow, keeping in mind the use of "old" gear is encouraged. The same with spinning, and so on. It's really all about having fun, participating and maybe learning about a reel you've never cast before. I remember an ORCA member trying to cast an Indiana style reel for the first time, with not so great results I might add, but I won't forget the laughs and memories from that event. I can't say I've ever heard a member turn down a request to try casting a fellow competitors rig, in fact most times its encouraged by the contestants.

Sure, winning the event is great, and we celebrate the accomplishment by putting the winners name on a plaque - an attractive one at that - for all to see, and it most certainly is something to be proud of, but the bottom line is to get out, interact with other reel collectors and have fun.

Jim


Thank you kindly good Sir for the follow-up.
Perhaps one day when you decide to have a Birdnest untangleing competition I may enter.


Posted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:31 pm 
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Perhaps one day when you decide to have a Birdnest untangleing competition I may enter.

Winner of that competition will have the most non-untangleable line chaos imaginable, and that individual will undoubtedly be moi. :mrgreen:

Tom


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